1976, 512 BB - Ferrari in Miniatures

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1976, 512 BB (Kyosho, diecast)

1976, 512 BB

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1976, 512 BB

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At its debut at the Paris Show in 1976, the 512 BB was equipped with a 5-litre version of the 12-cylinder boxer. The new engine proved a great success, giving the same power at lower revs, better torque and a smoother delivery than the earlier version in the 365 GT4 BB. The Pininfarina coachwork differed only slightly from the previous model in certain details which not only made it look even more elegant but also helped improve engine cooling.
The 512 BB was announced at the 1976 Paris Salon, replacing the 365 GT4/BB, and continued in production until 1981 when it was replaced by the 512 BBi, on which fuel injection replaced the carburettors. A total of 929 examples were produced during this period in the chassis number range 19677 to 38487. The new model title was far less of a mouthful than its predecessor, and broke with standard Ferrari practise of referring to the swept volume of a single cylinder. Instead it continued the theme started with the Dino series, of referring to the total engine capacity and number of cylinders. Hence it meant a 5 litre engine with 12 cylinders. The “BB” part of the model title had the same meaning as before “Berlinetta Boxer”, a reference to the two banks of six cylinders that were in a horizontally opposed layout. The basic principles, shape and features were similar to those of the model that it replaced, but there were small visual differences that differentiated the two cars, whilst under the skin the biggest difference was the increased capacity of the engine.
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© 2008-2020
VR65 Private Collection
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© 2008-2020
VR65 Private Collection
valera.dvs@gmail.com
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