1984, Testarossa - Ferrari in Miniatures

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Testarossa, 1984 (Kyosho, diecast)

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

1984, Testarossa

The Paris Motor Show in October 1984 saw the return of the glorious Testarossa as heir to the 512 BBi. Pininfarina’s design broke somewhat with tradition and was striking and innovative. The side intakes were larger than on the previous model and this constraint saw the introduction of the long side strakes that would become the Testarossa’s most recognisable feature.
The evolution of the 12-cylinder boxer engine saw it equipped with four valves per cylinder: the most powerful engine mounted on a production sports car at the time of its launch. The Testarossa was a model that took its name from the company’s history, being derived from the successful 500 and 250 Testa Rossa series of sports racing cars from the late fifties.
The name Testa Rossa is Italian for Red Head, and refers to the colour that the camshaft covers were painted on the sports racing models. Naturally the modern bearer of the name followed suit with red painted camshaft covers. It made its debut in the glittering surroundings of the Lido nightclub on the Champs Elysées in Paris, on the eve of the 1984 Paris Salon, where invited press and guests were given a gala preview prior to its public launch the following day.
The Pininfarina designed replacement for the Boxer series was visually radically different from its predecessor, although it still featured a mid mounted flat twelve engine as its motive power. Gone was the sharp nosed wedge profile, to be replaced by a much softer rounded front end. The front wings flowed into one of the models most distinctive styling features, the deeply straked door panels that grew in width towards their trailing edge, before blending into very wide rear wings. At the rear, the paired circular tail light arrangement that had been a styling feature for over a decade was gone. In their place was a full width horizontally slatted satin black louvre hiding rectangular combination light units.
The reason for the great rear girth and the body colour straked door louvres, was the twin side mounted water radiators which received their cooling air via the door intakes. The matt black egg crate “grille” in the nose of the car was a dummy to provide a link with Ferrari tradition, bordered by combination driving, side, turn indicator light assemblies, with paired headlights in retractable pods on the upper face of the nose. The repositioning of the radiators provided the benefit of additional luggage space in the nose, useable luggage space being something that had been a shortcoming of the Boxer series. Although the front track was only 12mm greater than that of the 512 BBi, the rear track increased by a massive 105mm, making the car wedge shape in plan rather than in profile.
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VR65 Private Collection
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© 2008-2024
VR65 Private Collection
valera.dvs@gmail.com
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